Friday, May 22, 2015

Dyson 360 Eye and Baidu Deep Learning at the Embedded Vision Summit in Santa Clara

Article From http://www.computervisionblog.com/2015/05/dyson-360-eye-and-baidu-deep-learning.html

While vision has been a research priority for decades, the results have often remained out of reach of the consumer. Huge strides have been made, but the final, and perhaps toughest, hurdle is how to integrate vision into real world products. It’s a long road from concept to finished machine, and to succeed, companies need clear objectives, a robust test plan, and the ability to adapt when those fail. 

Image from ExtremeTech: Dyson 360 Eye: Dyson’s ‘truly intelligent’ robotic vacuum cleaner is finally here

The Dyson 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner uses computer vision as its primary localization technology. 10 years in the making, it was taken from bleeding edge academic research to a robust, reliable and manufacturable solution by Mike Aldred and his team at Dyson. 

Mike Aldred’s keynote at next week's Embedded Vision Summit (May 12th in Santa Clara) will chart some of the high and lows of the project, the challenges of bridging between academia and business, and how to use a diverse team to take an idea from the lab into real homes.

Enabling Ubiquitous Visual Intelligence Through Deep Learning

Ren Wu 

Distinguished Scientist, Baidu Institute of Deep Learning

Deep learning techniques have been making headlines lately in computer vision research. Using techniques inspired by the human brain, deep learning employs massive replication of simple algorithms which learn to distinguish objects through training on vast numbers of examples. Neural networks trained in this way are gaining the ability to recognize objects as accurately as humans. Some experts believe that deep learning will transform the field of vision, enabling the widespread deployment of visual intelligence in many types of systems and applications. But there are many practical problems to be solved before this goal can be reached. For example, how can we create the massive sets of real-world images required to train neural networks? And given their massive computational requirements, how can we deploy neural networks into applications like mobile and wearable devices with tight cost and power consumption constraints? 

Ren Wu’s morning keynote at next week's Embedded Vision Summit (May 12th in Santa Clara) will share an insider’s perspective on these and other critical questions related to the practical use of neural networks for vision, based on the pioneering work being conducted by his team at Baidu.

Read More  http://www.computervisionblog.com/2015/05/dyson-360-eye-and-baidu-deep-learning.html

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